Movie Reviews

Film Review: Cuban Fury

by Gordon Elgart on April 11, 2014

This movie will dance its way into your heart … or something like that.

Nick Frost stars in the Nick Frost vehicle, Cuban Fury

Nick Frost stars in the Nick Frost vehicle, Cuban Fury

There’s a type of comedy movie called the star vehicle. It’s an old fashioned concept, but basically, it’s when you take a funny person and write a movie around him that plays to his strengths as a comic actor. That’s what Cuban Fury is. It’s a chance for Nick Frost to do Nick Frost things with a strong supporting cast, and as this sort of film, it absolutely works.

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The action stuff works so incredibly well, you’ll want a fan edit removing everything else.

Iko Uwais fights his way through a building ... again.

Iko Uwais fights his way through a building … again.

Gareth Evans knows how to shoot an action scene. This is a high compliment coming from me, because it’s so rare. He knows not to do too many quick cuts, he knows where to put the cameras, and he knows to show the performers doing the stunts. The way he designs action sequences to make brutal physical violence seem both balletic and funny is beyond what anyone else is doing in cinema these days.  The action stuff is so good and so fun, it’s a shame it has to be inside of a story, because the story itself drags down the final product. [read the whole post]

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Anthony Mackie, Mark Wahlberg and Duane Johnson in Pain & Gain

Anthony Mackie, Mark Wahlberg and Duane Johnson in Pain & Gain

When you hear the phrase “Directed by Michael Bay,” you probably think of some if not all of the following things: giant robots, massive explosions, military hardware, unnecessarily scantily clad and impossibly thin women and an insane amount of quick edits. You probably don’t think “passion project.” But that’s what we get here. In order to say yes to directing Transformers 4 for Paramount, Bay insisted that he be given the opportunity to make this “small budget” film ($25 million) based on a series of articles from the Miami New Times that document the exploits of the so-called Sun Gym Gang. The real story is brutal, full of twists and turns, and more than a little weird. So how would this translate into a Michael Bay picture? [read the whole post]

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Film Review: Parker

by Gordon Elgart on January 25, 2013

Jason Statham as Parker

Jason Statham as Parker

starring: Jason Statham, Jennifer Lopez and Michael Chiklis

written by: John J. McLaughlin

directed by: Taylor Hackford

MPAA: Rated R for strong violence, language throughout and brief sexual content/nudity [read the whole post]

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Benjamin Walker as Abraham Lincoln, readying his axe of justice.

Directed by: Timur Bekmambetov

Written by: Seth Grahame-Smith

Starring: Benjamin Walker, Rufus Sewell and Dominic Cooper

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Will Smith in MEN IN BLACK 3

starring: Will Smith, Tommy Lee Jones, Josh Brolin, Jemaine Clement, Emma Thompson

written by: Etan Cohen

directed by: Barry Sonnenfeld

MPAA: Rated PG-13 for sci-fi action violence, and brief suggestive content

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Fanboy Ramblings: “The Avengers”

May 4, 2012

For a well-thought-out, articulate, reasoned, educated review, I strongly suggest you click over to Jason LeRoy’s official review of The Avengers. For the ramblings of someone who’s read too many comics, seen too many comic movies at midnight, and overanalyzes every darn thing past the point of usefulness, read on.

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Album Review (with bonus movie talk): Daft Punk – TRON: Legacy Original Soundtrack

December 17, 2010
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m4cgLL8JaVI”

I’m a fan of the original 1982 movie TRON, even though I’m aware it’s kinda crappy. So I’ve been following the TRON: Legacy hype pretty closely for the last few years. And when I was sent Daft Punk’s TRON: Legacy Original Soundtrack for review, I immediately emailed our lead film reviewer, Jason LeRoy, and called […]

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Film Review: “The Agony and the Ecstasy of Phil Spector”

September 10, 2010

How do you solve a problem like Phil Spector? In The Agony and the Ecstasy of Phil Spector (opening today at the Roxie Theater), filmmaker Vikram Jayanti — who co-produced the Oscar-winning documentary When We Were Kings — creates a compelling but fundamentally flawed portrait of this culture-shaking musical genius and convicted murderer.

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SFIFF Film Review: “Pianomania”

May 6, 2010

As a child I was only allowed to listen to soft rock and classical music. Though I should have probably called CPS, I did not know any better. I do still however love both forms of music. This is probably why I thought Pianomania ruled. The music was absolutely enchanting.

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